Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Prospective study of the association of serum triglyceride and glucose with colorectal cancer

Tsushima M, Nomura AM, Lee J, Stemmermann GN

Abstract:
To determine if serum triglyceride and glucose levels are associated with colorectal cancer, a prospective study among 7619 Japanese-American men was conducted. From 1968 to 1998, 376 colon and 124 rectal cancer incident cases were diagnosed. A strong positive association of alcohol intake and pack-years of cigarette smoking with colorectal cancer was observed. Body mass index and heart rate were also positively related to colon, but not to rectal cancer. In contrast, serum triglyceride did not predict the development of either colon or rectal cancer. There was a modest association of serum glucose in the highest quartile group with rectal cancer (relative risk = 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-2.26), but it was not statistically significant. This study did not find a strong positive association of serum triglyceride or glucose with colorectal cancer, but additional studies including other metabolic consequences associated with increased serum triglyceride and glucose may clarify the relationship.

Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Mar;50(3):499-505. PMID: 15810632



A prospective study of colon and rectal cancer among Hawaii Japanese men

Chyou PH, Nomura AM, Stemmermann GN

Abstract:
The goals of this study were to assess the association of diet, alcohol, smoking, and other life-style factors with the risk of colon and rectal cancer and to examine the differences in the risk factors associated with each cancer site. Information on diet, alcohol, smoking, and other life-style factors was obtained from 7945 Japanese-American men who were living in Hawaii and examined from 1965 through 1968. After 174,514 person-years of observation, 330 incident cases of colon cancer and 123 incident cases of rectal cancer were diagnosed by histology. The risk of both colon and rectal cancer increased with age, alcohol intake, and pack-years of cigarette smoking. For colon cancer, there was also a direct association with body mass index and heart rate, while an inverse association was observed with serum cholesterol, intake of monounsaturated fatty acid, and percentage of calories from fat. For rectal cancer, the risk decreased with an increase in the intake of carbohydrates as percentage of calories. These findings suggest that some of the risk factors for colon cancer are different from those for rectal cancer.

Annals of Epidemiology. 1996 Jul;6(4):276-82. PMID: 8876837



Diet, alcohol, smoking and cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract: a prospective study among Hawaii Japanese men

Chyou PH, Nomura AM, Stemmermann GN

Abstract:
A cohort study of upper aerodigestive tract cancer was conducted among 7,995 Japanese-American men who were interviewed and examined from 1965 to 1968. Information was collected about smoking history and alcohol and dietary intake. After 24 years, 92 incident cases with histological confirmation of diagnosis were identified. Current cigarette smokers at time of examination had a 3-fold risk for upper aerodigestive tract cancer compared with never-smokers. A dose-response relationship was present with increasing amount and duration of cigarette use. Consumption of beer, wine, spirits and total alcohol was strongly associated with increased risk. Of 23 food and beverage categories, only candy/jelly/soda pop consumption had a statistically significant inverse trend. Frequent consumption of fruit was also inversely associated with this cancer. In contrast, the risk tended to be positively associated with consumption of rice, seaweed, tofu or tsukudani (a mixed dish of fish, sugar, soy sauce and seaweed), but the dose-response relationship was not statistically significant. For nutrient intake, increased calcium and fat intake decreased the risk for this cancer.

Int J Cancer. 1995 Mar 3;60(5):616-21. PMID: 7860134



Alcohol in the aetiology of upper aerodigestive tract cancer

Kato I, Nomura AM

Abstract:
The incidence rates of upper aerodigestive tract cancer are much higher in males than in females and show marked geographical variations [1]. They are generally high in France, Brazil, India and U.S. blacks, and low in China, Japan, the Middle East and several eastern and northern European countries [1]. However, these variations are not consistent across subsites of the upper aerodigestive tract. For example, high incidence rates for oesophageal cancer are observed in China and Japan [1].

Eur J Cancer.: Part B - Oral Oncology. 1994;30B(2):75-81. PMID: 8032304



A prospective study of alcohol, diet, and other lifestyle factors in relation to obstructive uropathy

Chyou PH, Nomura AM, Stemmermann GN, Hankin JH

Abstract:
The association of alcohol, diet, and other lifestyle factors with obstructive uropathy was investigated in a cohort of 6581 Japanese-American men, examined and interviewed from 1971 to 1975 in Hawaii. By studying this migrant population with its heterogeneous exposures, it increases the probabilities of identifying potential risk factors of this prostate disorder. After 17 years of follow-up, 846 incident cases of surgically treated obstructive uropathy were diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Total alcohol intake was inversely associated with obstructive uropathy (P < 0.0001). The relative risk was 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.78) for men drinking at least 25 ounces of alcohol per month compared with nondrinkers. Among the 4 sources of alcohol, a significant inverse association was present for beer, wine, and sake, but not for spirits. Buddhist (vs. other) religion, rural (vs. urban) birthplace, and the presence of prostate symptoms were each associated with increased risk of obstructive uropathy, but no association was found with education, number of marriages, or cigarette smoking. Increased beef intake was weakly related to an increased risk (P = 0.047), while no association was found with the consumption of 32 other food items in the study.

Prostate. 1993;22(3):253-64. PMID: 7683816

  
  
  
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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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