Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Endocrine status in normal British, Japanese and Hawaiian-Japanese women

Hayward JL, Greenwood FC, Glober G, Stemmermann GN, Bulbrook RD, Wang DY, Kumaokas S.

Abstract:
A pilot study has been carried out on the endocrine status of Hawaiian-Japanese, Japanese and British women. There were no striking differences between the three racial groups when ovarian and pituitary hormone levels were compared. British women had significantly higher plasma and urinary adrenal androgen levels and excreted more urinary corticosteroids than Japanese women: Hawaiian-Japanese women tended to have intermediate levels of these hormones, This effect of environment on endocrine status and its relationship to the risk of breast cancer is discussed.

Eur J Cancer. 1978 Nov;14(11):1221-28. PMID: 738328



Breast cancer and diet among the Japanese in Hawaii

Nomura AM, Henderson BE, Lee J.

Abstract:
Eighty-six Japanese men out of 6860 male participants in a prospective study of cancer were married to women who had breast cancer. These 86 men were compared with the remaining men by dietary factors that were identified during two different time periods. Based on the assumption that there is a similarity between husbands and wives in their dietary patterns, it was noted that the spouses of women with breast cancer consumed more beef or meat, butter/margarine/cheese, corn, and wieners than the other men. Furthermore, the breast cancer spouses also consumed less Japanese foods than controls, even though there were minimal differences between the two groups in other Oriental practices. These results suggest that certain American foods are important in the search for possible dietary factors related to the occurrence of breast cancer in women.

AM J Clin Nutr. 1978 Nov;31(11):2020-25. PMID: 717275



Consecutive radiography of breast slices for estimation of glandular volume and detection of small subclinical lesions. A comparison between Japan and Hawaii Japanese

Sasano N, Tamahashi N, Namiki T, Stemmermann GN.

Abstract:
A technique of consecutive radiography of the serially sliced breast was evolved and applied to a comparative study on the breast of Japanese in Japan (75 subjects) and Hawaii (49). Increased mammary fat accounts for an increase in the size of the Hawaii Japanese breast (mean; 152.4 cm3) in comparison with that in Japan (82.5 cm3). However, the glandular volume calculated from the radiography and lobular structures in histology were not significantly different in the two groups. A small subclinical lesion measuring over 3 mm in diameter in a histological section was radiographically detected. In Hawaii, duct-epithelial hyperplasia and apocrine metaplasia were significantly more prevalent in Japan, and the former lesion was most conspicuous in the large mammary gland.

Tohoku J Exp Med. 1975 Nov;117(3):217-24. PMID: 1202655



The Japan-Hawaii cancer study: A progress report

Nomura AM, Stemmermann GN, Rhoads GG, Glober GA.

Abstract:
The primary aim of the Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study is to identify. risk factors which are important in the development of cancer. Many investigations have been conducted in this long term prospective study since its inception in 1971. Among the findings to date are the following: 1) bowel transit time does not appear to be related to the occurrence of large bowel cancer; 2) adenomatous and hyperplastic polyps, as well as diverticula, are much more prevalent among Japanese autopsied cases in Hawaii than in Japan; 3) although the incidence of the diffuse histopathological type of gastric cancer does not differ appreciably in Japanese in Hawaii and in Japan, the migrant Japanese have a significantly lower incidence rate of the intestinal type of stomach cancer; 4) hyperplasia of mammary duct epithelia and apocrine metaplasia are more common in Japanese women in Hawaii than in Japan.

Hawaii Med J. 1975 Sep;34(9):309-16. PMID: 1184381

  
  
  
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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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