Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

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Association of diet and other factors with adenomatous polyps of the large bowel: a prospective autopsy study

Stemmermann GN, Heilbrun LK, Nomura AM

Abstract:
The risk of developing adenomatous polyps of the large bowel was studied in 163 Hawaii Japanese autopsy subjects. They constitute a subset of 8006 men originally examined from 1965 to 1968 and of those who died from 1969 to 1984. Adenomas were found in 79 autopsied subjects but not in the remaining 84 subjects. The study looked at a number of dietary, physical, laboratory, and social variables in relation to the risk of adenomatous polyps. No significant differences were observed between subjects with and without adenomas in intake of dietary fat, proteins, or carbohydrates and in body mass index, level of physical activity, serum cholesterol, or cigarette smoking history. The only significant association was the increase in the mean number of polyps (1.04, 0.87, 1.61, and 2.34) with increasing levels of alcohol intake but the trend was not monotonic. The accrual of more subjects into the study is needed to investigate this association more thoroughly.

AM J Clin Nutr. 1988 Feb;47(2):312-17. PMID: 3341261



Enteric microenvironment and its effect upon the morbid anatomy of the colon. A study of colon cancer, its precursors, and its companions in Hawaii Japanese

Stemmermann GN, Hayashi T, Yatani R.

Abstract:
The digestive tract is a distinct ecologic system. The lumen of each level of the gut has a microenvironment that is the product of whatever is eaten or drunk, modified by the secretions of each organ and its tributaries and by the microorganisms that share the table of the host. For too many years pathologists have been caught up in the controversy as to whether or not adenomatous polyps are an important source of colon cancer. The resolution of this controversy may well influence the clinical management of polyps and it is understandable that the surgical pathologist should invest considerable concern in this subject.

Pathol Annu. 1978;13 Pt 1:1-18. PMID: 364380



Outpatient screening for gastrointestinal lesions using guaiac-impregnated slides

Glober GA, Peskoe SM.

Abstract:
A study of international cancer risk differences provided an opportunity to evaluate the Greegor test on an outpatient basis. 1,539 Japanese-American men performed the test, which indentifies blood in feces through the use of guaiac-impregnated slides. Subjects having occult blood were asked to repeat the procedure on a meat-free, high-bulk diet. Four asymptomatic cancers were among 25 gastrointestinal lesions subsequently identified in individuals with positive, restricted-diet guaiac tests. In three of the four cancer cases, only weakly positive guaiac reactions were found.

Am J Dig Dis. 1974 May;19(5):399-403. PMID: 4207753



Pathogenesis of hyperplastic polyps of the colon: a hypothesis based on ultrastructure and in vitro cell kinetics

Hayashi T, Yatani R, Apostol J, Stemmermann GN.

Abstract:
The morphology of hyperplastic polyps and the cell kinetics of their cell populations suggests that they result from hypermaturation of epithelium on the colon surface. The morphological features which support this hypothesis are the superficial location of maximal change, cell elongation, increase in the number and length of microvilli, accentuation of lateral intercellular interdigitations, and an increase in the breadth of basal lamina attachment. Cell kinetics studies indicate that their mode of cell renewal is the same as that of normal mucosa, but with longer turnover time and delayed migration.

Gastroenterology. 1974 Mar;66(3):347-56. PMID: 4813500

  
  
  
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